Double Herringbone Stitch Tutorial

If you like Herringbone stitch, then you will love Double Herringbone. It’s twice as much fun! The double layer of stitches adds a level of detail and intricacy to this already deceivingly fancy looking stitch. Follow along as we learn the simple steps for doubling those herringbones.

Double Herringbone Stitch Tutorial

Double Herringbone Tutorial

Start by making a row of single Herringbone stitch. You will be filling in the spaces between the stitches, so be sure to space them generously.

Not familiar with Herringbone Stitch? Master the technique by following my step-by-step tutorial: Herringbone Stitch Embroidery Tutorial

Herringbone Stitch

The basic idea of this stitch is to add a second layer of stitches on top of the first layer. Therefore, the steps for double herringbone are the same as the steps for single herringbone.

One change to note is that while the first stitch of single herringbone starts at the top of the marked lines, double herringbone starts on the bottom line with a single diagonal stitch from A to B. Determine the placement of point B by following the same 3/4 rule as for single herringbone .

Double Herringbone Stitch Tutorial

Bring the needle back out at point C and make another diagonal stitch down to point D. You will notice that the angle of this stitch matches the angle of the first single herringbone stitch.

Double Herringbone Stitch Tutorial

Continue stitching in this manner until you reach the end of the line.

Double Herringbone Stitch Tutorial

Double herringbone can be stitched with a single color thread, or with a contrasting color for the second row.

Double Herringbone Stitch Tutorial

Irregular Double Herringbone

This variation of double herringbone produces an off-center row of smaller stitches on top of the first row.

Start by marking four parallel lines that follow the pattern below. Exact measurements are not necessary, but the idea is to place the middle lines closer to the top and bottom instead of spacing the lines evenly.

Stitch a row of single herringbone using the top and bottom line as a guide. For this first row, the additional lines are not used.

Next, using a contrasting color thread, start stitching a second row of herringbone. The steps are the same as the double herringbone above, except the stitches start and end on the two marked middle guidelines.

Irregular Double Herringbone Stitch

You will notice that in this variation, the second row of herringbone does not match up with the first. That’s what makes it irregular!

Irregular Double Herringbone Stitch
Irregular Double Herringbone Stitch

Happy Stitching!

Free Apple Sampler Embroidery Pattern

Practice your stitching skills with this FREE Apple Sampler embroidery pattern! Sharpen your skills while creating a masterpiece that almost looks good enough to eat. Frame this piece in the hoop, in a wooden frame, or turn it into a pillow, tea towel, market bag, or anything else you desire!

Apple Sampler Embroidery Pattern

Three Colors, Four Apples, Five Stitches

The apple sampler uses two floss colors and five stitches.

Apple # 1: Chevron Stitch & DMC floss 347
Apple # 2: Chain Stitch & DMC floss 355
Apple # 3: Outline Stitch & DMC floss 355
Apple # 4: Herringbone & Split Stitch & DMC floss 347

You can find the full line of embroidery stitch tutorials in my library of step-by-step embroidery tutorials.

Apple Sampler Embroidery Pattern Download

Apple Sampler Embroidery Pattern

The free embroidery pattern is available to download as a PDF by clicking HERE, or on the title above. The PDF includes:

  • Full-color photo of the finished embroidery piece
  • One pattern sized to fit a 7 or 8″ hoop
  • Reverse image of the pattern for iron-on transfer option
  • Printable stitch and color guide
  • Material list
  • Instructions for transferring the pattern using three simple methods
  • Directions for framing the finished embroidery
Apple Sampler Embroidery Pattern

Happy Stitching!
~ Amanda

Herringbone Stitch Embroidery Tutorial

Herringbone Stitch is made up of a series of parallel diagonal lines that cross at the top and bottom. As the name suggests, it resembles a row of crossed fishbones. This simple stitch is easy to learn and versatile in use. There are numerous variations beyond the basic stitch – several of the most popular are covered in this tutorial.

Herringbone Stitch Embroidery Tutorial

Herringbone Stitch Step-By-Step

Herringbone stitch is worked from left to right. Start by marking two parallel lines a short distance from each other. For this example, the marked lines are 3/8″ apart. While I find this to be a good distance of measurement for practice, herringbone is easily adaptable to longer or shorter stitches.

Starting on the right side of the line, make the first stitch from top to bottom at a diagonal slant.

Herringbone Stitch Embroidery Tutorial

Bring the needle back up at point C, a short distance from where the last stitch ended (point B) and make another diagonal line up to point D.

Herringbone Stitch Embroidery Tutorial

The third stitch starts at the top (point E) and makes another diagonal line down to point F. Note that the lines from A to B and E to F are parallel to each other and the diagonal angles match.

Herringbone Stitch Embroidery Tutorial

Notes about Placement & Measurements

While there are no set rules for the angle of the stitches or the distance between lines, it can be useful to have some guidelines to follow when learning a new stitch.

  • Three-Quarter Rule:
    The placement of point C is determined by taking the distance between the start of the marked line and point B, dividing it into quarters, and placing point C at the 3/4 mark. The same rule applies to point E which lies at the 3/4 mark between point A and point D. While measuring the exact distance between each stitch is unnecessary, keeping the 3/4 rule in mind will help ensure an even line of stitches.
  • Parallel Lines:
    The angle of the first diagonal stitch is the basis by which all the other stitches are formed. The exact angle is not as important as keeping the angle of the stitches the same. The easiest way to accomplish this is by making sure the lines of stitches are parallel to each other. I like to stretch the thread across the fabric to ensure I have the correct placement before inserting the needle.
Herringbone Stitch Embroidery Tutorial

Following the above guidelines, continue stitching until you reach the end of the line.

Herringbone Stitch Embroidery Tutorial

While herringbone stitch is most often used a border, it can also be stitched in rows and used to fill shapes. Simply draw several parallel lines and stitch the rows on top of each other.

Herringbone Stitch Embroidery Tutorial

Tacked or Tied Herringbone Stitch

There are many variations of the basic herringbone stitch. One of the easiest is tied or tacked herringbone. This variation can be made using the same color, or a contrasting color thread.

Start with a line of herringbone and bring the needle up next to the first spot where two threads cross. Come back down on the other side to complete a small horizontal stitch. Continue adding small stitches to all the areas where the lines of thread cross.

Tacked Herringbone Stitch
Tacked Herringbone Stitch

Take this variation one step farther by adding an additional vertical stitch to make a t-shape.

Tacked Herringbone Stitch

Threaded Herringbone Stitch

Another easy yet eye catching variation is called threaded herringbone. This one looks best with a contrasting color thread.

Once again, start with a row of basic herringbone. Bring a needle and contrasting color thread up at the start of the line of stitches. Without going through fabric, thread the needle under the first stitch from right to left.

Threaded Herringbone

Twist the thread over the top of the first crossed section, then back under the next diagonal stitch. Be careful not to pull too tight.

Threaded Herringbone

Continue weaving under the diagonal lines and over the crossed sections, until you reach the end of the line. End the threading by bringing the needle down and through the fabric at the bottom of the last herringbone stitch.

Threaded Herringbone

Twisted Herringbone (Breton Stitch)

This variation creates a twisted version of the herringbone stitch. It can be easily modified with longer or shorter stitches, and looks nice stitched around curves or in a circle.

Start with a single diagonal stitch from point A to B. Bring the needle back up at point C like you would for the traditional herringbone stitch. Instead of making another diagonal stitch, pass the thread under the first stitch from right to left without going through the fabric.

Breton Stitch

Pull the thread tight to create a twist.

Breton Stitch

Bring the needle back down at point D. Repeat these steps for the next stitch. Starting at point E, make a stitch up to point F, come back out at point G, and pass the needle under the stitch before pulling it tight to create the twist.

Breton Stitch

Continue following this stitching pattern until you reach the end of the line.

Breton Stitch

Double Herringbone Stitch

Want to learn more herringbone stitch variations? Check out the Double Herringbone Stitch Tutorial.

Double Herringbone Stitch

Herringbone Patterns

Looking for a project to put your newfound stitching skills to use? The Apple Baskets Embroidery Pattern features piles of shiny red apples spilling out of two baskets beautifully decorated with herringbone stitch. Using both the basic stitch along with the twisted and tacked versions, this is a great pattern for practicing and mastering herringbone stitch.

Happy Stitching!

Chevron Stitch Embroidery Tutorial

With its unique zig zag pattern, Chevron Stitch makes beautiful borders and outlines. It can also be used as a filler stitch for a variety of shapes. Comprised of diagonal lines capped on the top and bottom by small horizontal lines, this stitch is simple to learn and even easier to incorporate into your embroidery projects. This step-by-step tutorial covers the basic stitch along with multiple variations.

Chevron Stitch Embroidery Tutorial

Chevron Stitch Step-by-Step

Start your row of chevron stitch by marking two parallel lines. There is no set rule regarding the distance between the lines, but when practicing, I suggest no more than 1/2″ apart.

Once you have the guidelines drawn, begin by making a single straight stitch from point A to B. Before pulling the thread all the way through, bring the needle back up in the middle of the stitch (Point C). Make sure the thread is below the line, then complete the stitch.

Chevron Stitch Embroidery Tutorial

Next, make a diagonal stitch from point C to point D.

Chevron Stitch Embroidery Tutorial

Repeat the first stitch at the top by making a straight stitch from Point E to F.

Chevron Stitch Embroidery Tutorial

Once again, before you pull the thread all the way through, bring the needle back up and out through Point D. This time, keep the thread on top of the line before completing the stitch.

Chevron Stitch Embroidery Tutorial

Make another diagonal stitch from Point D to the bottom line.

Chevron Stitch Embroidery Tutorial

From here, it’s a matter of repeating the steps and continuing to stitch until the end of your line. Make a straight stitch along the bottom line, bring the needle back out through the point where you ended the last diagonal stitch, make another diagonal stitch up to the top line, and then make another straight stitch at the top.

Chevron Stitch Embroidery Tutorial

Keep in mind that you want the spaces between the horizontal stitches to roughly equal the length of the horizontal stitches. You can mark out the length of each horizontal stitch to use a guide, but I think you will find that after some practice it’s not too difficult to estimate the length of the stitches.

Chevron Stitch Embroidery Tutorial

Chevron Stitch Variations

There are numerous variations for the basic straight line chevron stitch. It can be stitched on a curve…

Curved Chevron Stitch

Used as a filler for an uniform shape…

Chevron Filler Stitch

Or used as a filler for a non-uniform shape….

Chevron Filler Stitch

All of the above variations are stitched following the same steps as those listed for the basic straight line version. For curves and non-uniform shapes, remember to keep the distance between the horizontal lines uniform and use that as a guide to dictate the placement of the vertical lines.

Double Chevron Stitch

Double chevron is perhaps my favorite of all the chevron stitch variations. The method for double chevron is simple. First, stitch a row of plain chevron stitch. Next, stitch a second layer of chevron using a different color thread. Fill in the spaces left by the first row of stitches with the second row.

In the example below, I started the second row (yellow thread) with a small horizontal line on the top and then made a diagonal stitch to the bottom. The bottom horizontal line fills in the space left between the gray lines.

Double Chevron Stitch

You can stitch the second row on the top of the first, or you can weave the second layer under the first. My example shows the top layer woven under the bottom on the upward diagonal lines only.

Double Chevron Stitch

Chevron Stitch Embroidery Pattern

Want to try out chevron stitch in an embroidery pattern? The Chevron Dragonfly Pattern utilizes the stitch to create a beautifully decorated dragonfly atop a blooming flower.

Happy Stitching!


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