Ray Stitch Embroidery Tutorial

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Ray stitch is one of those simple stitches that creates amazing results. Also known as Fan Stitch, it is made with a series of straight stitches that start on the outer points and end at a single middle point.

Ray Stitch Embroidery Tutorial

Ray stitch can be stitched free-hand after a bit of practice, or by drawing a simple triangle with a line in the center to use a guide. If you choose to draw a guide, be sure to use a water-soluble pen as the lines will not be covered by the thread.

Start the first stitch at the bottom of the line. Come up at point A, move the needle up to point B, and re-insert through the fabric. This is the tail of the ray.

Start the second stitch at the top of the triangle (point c) and bring it down to point B. Re-insert the needle in the same spot where the first stitch ended.

The third and fourth stitches both start below point C and on the line of the triangle. You will notice that point D and E are parrallel to each other. Both stitches end at point B.

The final two stitches follow the same pattern. Point F and G are below the previous two stitches and parallel to each other. Again, these stitches end at point B.

Ray Stitch Embroidery Tutorial

And that’s it! There are many ways to alter ray stitch, but the basic stitch contains five points that start on the outer edge and end at a common point in the middle. Some simple ways to vary the stitch are by shortening or lengthening the tail at the bottom, making the tail the same length as the tallest ray, or spacing the rays wider apart.

Ray Stitch Embroidery Tutorial

You can also omit the tail altogether.

Ray Stitch Embroidery Tutorial

Ray Stitch in Embroidery Patterns

Ray stitch has many uses in embroidery. Stitched on a close line, it makes an interesting border, arranged in a circle, it makes a fantastic liner shape, and spaced out along a line of stitching, it creates an instant tropical plant stalk.

Ray Stitch Embroidery Tutorial

Oyster Stitch Embroidery Tutorial

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Oyster Stitch is a detached type of chain stitch that creates a compact, oval shape filled with twisted threads. This is one of those deceiving stitches that looks complicated but is actually quite simple to master. It is commonly used to make small leaves or flower petals, or strung together to create interesting borders.

Oyster Stitch Embroidery Tutorial

Oyster Stitch Step-By-Step

Oyster stitch is a member of the chain stitch family and while it can be helpful to have basic knowledge of chain and twisted chain stitch, it’s not necessary to learn this stitch.
Chain Stitch Tutorial
Twisted Chain Stitch Tutorial

Start by drawing a short line to use a guide. We’re going to be working from top to bottom. Bring the thread up and out at the top of the line (point A). Re-insert the needle just to the left (point B) and then bring it out one stitch length away on the line (point C).

Oyster Stitch Embroidery Tutorial

Wrap the thread around and under the needle.

Oyster Stitch Embroidery Tutorial

Pull the needle all the way through to create a twisted loop.

Oyster Stitch Embroidery Tutorial

Next, take the needle through the right leg of the twisted loop without going through the fabric. Gently pull the thread so it wraps around the right side of the twisted loop. I find it helpful to put one finger on the bottom of the loop to prevent it from pulling too tight.

Oyster Stitch Embroidery Tutorial

Next, we’re going to wrap the thread around the twisted knot that you just created. Start by inserting the needle next to the right leg of the first loop (point A) and coming back out at the bottom of the loop (point B).

Oyster Stitch Embroidery Tutorial

Wrap the thread around and under the needle, pull the needle through, and anchor it with a small stitch at the bottom.

Oyster Stitch Embroidery Tutorial

Oyster Stitch in Embroidery

Oyster stitch can be used in a variety of applications: on its own to make cute little textured leaves, stitched in a circle to make flower petals, or arranged in a line to make an interesting border.

Oyster Stitch Embroidery Tutorial
Oyster Stitch Embroidery Tutorial

Rope Stitch Embroidery Tutorial

posted in: Stitch Tutorial | 0

Rope stitch creates a thick twisted line that resembles a rope or cord. It is commonly used for borders, curved outlines, or to stitch stems and thin leaves. A member of the chain stitch family, rope stitch is formed by working twisted chain stitch close together along a line. If you are already familiar with twisted chain stitch, great! If not, follow along below and you will soon be stitching like a pro.

Rope Stitch Embroidery Tutorial

Rope Stitch Step-By-Step Instructions

Rope stitch is worked from right to left or bottom to top. Start by drawing a straight or gently curved line to work from. Bring the needle up at the beginning of the line (Point A). Pull it all the way through and then re-insert to the left of the line (Point B). Bring the needle back out on the line one stitch length away (Point C) without pulling the thread all the way through.

Rope Stitch Embroidery Tutorial

Wrap the working thread around the needle in a clockwise direction and pull the needle through. You now have a single twisted chain.

Rope Stitch Embroidery Tutorial

This is the point where the instructions differ from twisted chain stitch. Instead of starting the second stitch at the top of the twist, we are going to start it at the bottom, to the left and just a little bit above point B. Insert the needle here (Point D) and then bring it out one stitch length away on the line (Point E).

Rope Stitch Embroidery Tutorial

Loop the thread around the needle, pull it through, and admire your work. Continue stitching in this manner until you reach the end of the desired length. To end the stitch, make the final stitch shorter than all the rest, and then insert the needle over the top of the last loop to anchor it in place.

Rope Stitch Embroidery Tutorial

Curves & Thread Choice

Rope Stitch handles curves beautifully, with the exception of tight curves that are better left to other stitches. (Both stem and outline stitch work well for tight curves while achieving a similar twisted rope look). When stitching around curves, the stitches will get longer on the curve and shorter at the end of the curve.

Rope Stitch Embroidery Tutorial

The type of thread you use for rope stitch will greatly impact the final result. For the example above I used three strands of DMC cotton floss which produces a medium weight rope. The more strands you use, the thicker the rope will be. For an even more dramatic rope stitch, try using Perle cotton floss.

Rope Stitch Embroidery Tutorial

Rope Stitch Foliage

While rope stitch is an excellent choice for borders and outlines, it can also be used to create leaves. Let’s learn how! Start by drawing a slightly curved line and stitching over it with rope stitch. For this example, I am using 3 strands of DMC floss for the stem.

Rope Stitch Embroidery Tutorial

Next, draw some thin leaves staggered along the stem.

Rope Stitch Leaves

Using all 6 strands of DMC cotton floss, begin filling in the leaves. Use the same method as outlined above, but instead of starting the stitch to the left of the line and ending it on the line (see photo 1), you will start the stitch on the left line (point A) and end it on the right line (point B).

Rope Stitch Leaf

As you work your way up the leaf, the stitch length will increase at the widest point of the leaf and decrease as you reach the top of the leaf. Keep the stitches as close together as possible to achieve a fully filled leaf made up of slanted stitches.

Rope Stitch Leaf

Repeat for the rest of the leaves. You now have a leaf spray stitched entirely with rope stitch!

Rope Stitch Leaf

Happy Stitching!

Twisted Chain Stitch Embroidery Tutorial

posted in: Stitch Tutorial | 0

Twisted chain stitch is a variation of the basic Chain Stitch. While both are comprised of connected loops that form a chain-like line, twisted chain differs in that the loop is twisted in the middle. This is one of those simple and useful stitches that you will find yourself returning to again and again.

Twisted Chain Stitch Embroidery Tutorial

Twisted Chain Stitch Step-By-Step

Twisted chain stitch is worked from right to left or bottom to top. For this example, I am stitching a straight line from bottom to top. Start by bringing the needle to the front at the beginning of your line (Point A). Pull it all the way through and then re-insert just to the left of the line (Point B). Bring the needle back out on the line one stitch length away (Point C). Don’t pull the thread all the way through yet.

Twisted Chain Stitch Embroidery Tutorial

Next, wrap the working thread around the needle in a clockwise direction.

Twisted Chain Stitch Embroidery Tutorial

Pull the needle all the way through. You now have your first twisted chain.

Form the second loop in the chain by inserting the needle to the left of the previous loop (point D) and then bringing it back out on the line one stitch length away (point E).

Twisted Chain Stitch Embroidery Tutorial

Once again, loop the thread around the needle and pull it all the way through. Now your chain has two twisted loops.

Twisted Chain Stitch Embroidery Tutorial

Continue stitching in this fashion until you reach the desired length. To end the stitch, simply insert the needle at the top of the last loop to anchor it in place.

Twisted Chain Stitch Embroidery Tutorial

Twisted Chain is a great stitch for straight borders, wavy lines or shape outlines.

Twisted Chain Stitch Embroidery Tutorial

More Embroidery Tutorials from the Chain Stitch Family:

Chain Stitch
Heavy Chain Stitch
Lazy Daisy Stitch

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